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Charles K. Kao
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Willard S. Boyle
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George E. Smith

Charles K. Kao: won half of the prize for groundbreaking achievements in concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication. He carefully calculated how to transmit light over long distances via optical glass fibers. With a fiber of purest glass it would be possible to transmit light signals over 100 kilometers, compared to only 20 meters for the fibers available in the 1960s.
Willard S. Boyle & George E. Smith
: both won one-fourth of the prize for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit -- the CCD sensor. Both these men work for Bell Laboratories.

Chauntevia Flowers.
Period 2 .
Honors Physics.


Three men were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 2009
  1. Charles K. Kao won 1/2 of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He discovered the transmission of lights in fiber optics. He was awarded the prize for this. He works in a standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow United Kingdom, Chinese Univeristy of Hong Kong.
  2. Williard S. Boyle won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He works in Bell Labortories in Murrays Hill, New Jersey, USA.
  3. George E. Smith also won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. Smith partnered with Boyle working in Bell Laboratories with him in NJ. The were both honored with the prize for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor.
By Jazmin Wright
Honors Physics
6th Period


Nobel Prize Winners by Rachel S.
  • Charles K. Kao: Received ½ of the prize for "groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication". Kao’s discovery of fiber light-loss properties now is recognized as one of the essential milestones for the development of fiber-optic communications. In 2000, Kao founded the Independent Schools Foundation Academy. He stepped down from the Board of the ISF Foundation in 2008.

  • Willard S. Boyle: Received ¼ of the prize for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit— the CCD sensor". Willard Boyle was the Executive Director of Research for Bell Labs from 1975 until his retirement in 1979. He settled Nova Scotia and helped his wife launch an art gallery.

  • George E. Smith: Received ¼ of the prize for the co-invention of the charge-coupled device with Willard Boyle. After retirement, Smith sailed around the world with his wife. He eventually settled in New Jersey.




external image PT_2219.jpg

Charles K. Kao recived a half of the award because of his development and use of fiber optics in telecommunications and he is also known as the Father of Fiber Optics in Communications. Charles suffers Alzheimer's disease and him and his wife are planning on giving some of the money to a aging research and care to help out.

Willard S. Boyle won a half of the award because of his the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor. Boyle now lives in Hailifax with his wiffe.

Geoge E. Smith one the last quart of the award because of his the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor. Smith now resides with his wife in New Jersey after giving up his long time life hobby of traveling the world.



BY MARC ANTHONY GARDNER

\This page is for students reporting on the 2009 Nobel Prize in Phyiscs.


By Nahdir Austin


Ashlee Chambers


By, Angela Parashos


by Aamir Austin

The 2009 Nobel Prize in Phyiscs was awarded to three men, Charles k. Kao, Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith .​



Charles K. Kao
Charles won 1/2 of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. Kao was award for his work with the transmission of light in fiber optics. He works in a standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow United Kingdom. He has a bachelors of science from the University of London.
Williard S. Boyle
Willard won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He works in Bell Labortories in New Jersey. Boyle helped developed the CCD device. In bell labs Willard was doing research to find a way to devople a financial plan on a grant. .

George E. Smith
Goerge E. Smith won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. Smith's works are done in New Jersey in Bell Laboratories, where along with Willard S. Boyle. Smith worked fellow Nobel prize winner William Boyle on CCD or charge-coupled devices.
Amir Brockenbrough





Charles K. Kao

Charles won 1/2 of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He works in a standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow United Kingdom, Chinese Univeristy of Hong Kong. He was was honored for finding the transmission of lights in fiber optics.

Williard S. Boyle
Willard won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He works in Bell Labortories in Murrays Hill, New Jersey, USA. In bell labs Willard was doing research to find a way to devople a financial plan on a grant. He had to tell what you would be doing in the first, second and third year and tell what your goal would be for your profits and loses.

George E. Smith
Goerge also won 1/4th of the Noble Prize in Phyiscs. He works in Bell Labortories in Murrys Hill, New Jersey, USA. Goerge partnered with Willard S. Boyle, it was no set direction of research. THe were honored for inventing a imaging semiconductor circuit known as the CCD senor.

- Tiffanie Thornton
10-15-09






The Master of Fiber Optics
Diana Patton


Charles K. Kao
Charles K. Kao

Charles K. Kao, Kao is widely regarded as the "Father of Fiber Optic Communications". He was awarded half of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics for "groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication".He made a discovery that led to a breakthrough in fiber optics. He carefully calculated how to transmit light over long distances via optical glass fibers. He currently works in the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow, United Kingdom and the Chinese University of Hong Kong.
Willard S. Boyle
Willard S. Boyle

Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith, a couple of scientists from Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ for their invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit otherwise known as the CCD sensor.
George E. Smith
George E. Smith

Smith works at Bell Laboratories, where along with Willard S. Boyle, he performed groundbreaking research into the development of charge-coupled devices. He recived 1/4 of the of the Nobel Peace Prize for Physics.


Rich Lion Period 2
Charles K Kao
was born in Shanghai China, November 4, 1933. Kao was awarded half of the nobel prize for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication. He now works in a standard Telecommunication Laboratory in Harlow, England as well as The Chinese University in Hong Kong. He is currently Chairman and CEO of ITX Services. As of 2009, he resides back in his birthplace of Hong Kong and often travels to the United States to visit his family.

Willard S Boyle was born in Nova Scotia, Canada August 19, 1924. Boyle received a quarter of the nobel prize for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor. He works at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hills, New Jersey.

George E Smith was born in White Plains, New York May 10, 1930. Smith received a quarter of the nobel prize for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor. Smith worked along with Willard S. Boyle to invent the CCD sensor a device for the movement of electrical charge, usually from within the device to an area where the charge can be controlled, for example conversion into a digital value. Smith Currently lives in Waretown, New Jersey.


The 2009 Nobel Prize in Phyiscs


Viktor Ripka, Period 8

The Nobel Prize in Physics for year 2009 was awarded to three men:

Charles K Kao external image 000083_19.jpg

-born 4 November 1933
-a pioneer in the development and use of fiber optics in telecommunications
-he won the prize because of "groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication"
-he is from China and also speaks English and French
-he won 1/2 prize




Williard S. Boyle
external image willard-boyle-askmeany.jpg-born August 19, 1924
-Canadian physicist
-invented the charge-coupled device (CCD)
-he won 1/4 prize





George E. Smith
external image george_e_smith3.jpg
-born May 10, 1930 in America
-he is scientist and also applied physicist
-co-inventor of the charge-coupled device
-Smith served in the US Navy, attained his BSc at the University of Pennsylvania in 1955
-he won 1/4 prize





Ezar Muhammad
Period 2


The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Charles K. Kao, Willard S. Boyle, and George E. Smith.

Charles K. Kao was given half of the Nobel Prize for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication.
The other half was given to Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor.


external image Charles-Kao-Willard-Boyle-001.jpg

\\





By Rachael Jefferson
Period 2




Charles K. Kao


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Charles K. Kao

Charles K. Kao won half of the Noble Prize in Physics for the innovative idea of using the glass fiber to carry light signals. It was already known that glass absorbed most of the light signal, making it weak to deliver any information, Mr. Kao discovered the cause of this absorbtion and found that impurities in the glass absorb the light signal. His work laid the foundation of fiber optic communication. Charles worked at the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow, United Kingdom, but is now the chairman anf CEO of ITX Services. He currentley resides in Hong Kong and often travels to the U.S. to visit his family.


Willard S. Boyle

external image boyle-nobel-cp-7443195.jpgexternal image Nobel_Physics_JPEG_257373f.jpg
Willard S. Boyle

Willard S. Boyle is a Canadian physicist who one 1/4 of the Nobel Peace Prize in physics for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit -- the CCD sensor. He was an Executive Director of Research for Bell Labs from 1975 until his retirement in 1979. Boyle is currently retired and lives in Wallace, Nova Scotia with his wife Betty.


George E. Smith

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George E. Smith

George E. Smith is an American scientist and third winner of the Nobel Prize in physics. hew won 1/4 of the prize for his invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit-- the CCD sensor. he was the co-invento of the charged-couple device. Smith and Boyle both worked on this invention together. he worked in Bell Labs, located in Murray Hill, New Jersey from 1959 until his retirement in in 1986. George is currently retired, residing in Waretown, New Jersey with his wife Janet. He gave up his hobby of sailing in 2001 to "spare his creaky bones form further storms."

Aimee McCaughey
Period: 8
Physics Honors


2009 Winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics

Charles K. Kao
Charles K. Kao

Charles K. Kao was born in Shanghai in 1933. He was awarded 1/2 of the Nobel Prize in Physics for "groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication." Kao showed that the loss of signal in fiber optic cables was a result of impurities in the glass rather than a fundamental flaw in the technology. This discovery has brought a whole new aspect in the way we communicate. Kao worked at the Standard Telecommunication Laboratories in Harlow, England and currrently lives in Hong Kong.

Willard S. Boyle
Willard S. Boyle

Willard S. Boyle was born on August 24, 1924 in Amherst, Nova Scotia. He was awarded 1/4 of the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor." Boyle was Executive Director of Research for Bell Labs from 1975 until his retirement in 1979. He now resides in Wallace, Nova Scotia and has launched an art gallery with his wife Betty.

George E. Smith
George E. Smith

George E. Smith was born on May 10, 1930 in White Plains, New York. He was also awarded 1/4 of the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit—the CCD sensor." Smith worked at Bell Laboratories from 1959 through 1989, where along with Willard Boyle he performed groundbreaking research into the development of charge-coupled devices. He now lives in Waretown, New Jersey.

Naomi McCaughey
Period 8
period 8 alexis williams
Nobel prize in Physics 2009 winners
By Alexis Williams
Charles K. Kao was born in Shanghai made a discovery in 1966 that was soon to become our modern day fiber optics. Kao calculated that one could transmit light over long distances by using a refined glass fiber. The fibers were more efficient and would absorb less light over long distances. His research intrigued many more scientists and the ultra pure fibers were made in 1970 . Kao suffers from Alzheimer’s, he and his wife are planning on donate part of the money to aging research and care
George E. Smith and Willard S. Boyle built the first CCD (Charge-Coupled Device).
They worked at Bell Labs in New Jersey during 1969. George E. Smith currently resides in Waretown, New Jersey. Willard S. Boyle resides with his wife of 62 years in Halifax Nova Scotia.

Bibliography :
"CBC News - World - Canadian scientist shares Nobel physics prize." CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV. Web. 06 Nov. 2009. http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2009/10/06/nobel-prize-physics-kao-boyle-smith281.html.

"Charles K. Kao -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 06 Nov. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_K._Kao>.


"George E. Smith -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 06 Nov. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_E._Smith>.